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Post-Gaming The Manhunt

A SWAT team unloads from their armored vehicles as they go door to door while searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, Mass., Friday, April 19, 2013.Two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing killed an MIT police officer, injured a transit officer in a firefight and threw explosive devices at police during their getaway attempt in a long night of violence that left one of them dead and another still at large Friday, authorities said as the manhunt intensified for a young man described as a dangerous terrorist. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

A SWAT team unloads from their armored vehicles as they go door to door while searching for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombings in Watertown, Mass., Friday, April 19, 2013.Two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing killed an MIT police officer, injured a transit officer in a firefight and threw explosive devices at police during their getaway attempt in a long night of violence that left one of them dead and another still at large Friday, authorities said as the manhunt intensified for a young man described as a dangerous terrorist. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

The police response to the Boston bombings was without precedent. But was it legal? Was it an overreaction? Was it a textbook case of urban crisis management? We’ll dig in.

Guests

Harvey Silverglate, Boston criminal defense and civil liberties litigator

Christine Cole, executive director of the program in Criminal Justice Policy and Management at Harvard Kennedy School. You can read her take here.

More

Huffington Post “Boston — often called the Cradle of Liberty — has often been the scene of political protest, political violence, and heavy-handed government crackdowns — military, paramilitary, and otherwise. As a result, throughout American history the city has been at the center of contentious, often furious debate over how best to balance public safety, crime fighting, and national defense with liberty and individual rights. Indeed, clashes in Boston between citizens and government played prominently into the colonies’ decision to fight the American Revolution itself; the dismantling of the Articles of Confederation; adoption of the Second, Third, and Fourth Amendments; the decision to include provisions for a standing army in the U.S. Constitution; the president’s authority to deploy soldiers domestically; and both the Posse Comitatus Act and the efforts to dismantle it the modern drug war era.”


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Hosts Meghna Chakrabarti and Anthony Brooks introduce us to newsmakers, big thinkers and artists and bring us stories of relevance to Bostonians here and around the region. Live every weekday at 3.

WBUR's Sacha Pfeiffer is co-hosting Radio Boston while Meghna Chakrabarti is on maternity leave.

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