90.9 WBUR - Boston's NPR news station
Top Stories:
PLEDGE NOW

Madeleine Albright Reflects On Women’s Rights, Diplomacy In Wellesley Return

Madeleine Albright speaks with students at Wellesley College. (Jessica Alpert/WBUR)

Madeleine Albright speaks with students at Wellesley College. (Jessica Alpert/WBUR)

The political science majors at Wellesley College this week welcomed one of their most famous alumnae to campus: Madeleine Albright, class of 1959.

After becoming secretary of state, Hillary Clinton wrote to friends at Wellesley College to thank them. Click to enlarge. (Courtesy: Wellesley College)

After becoming secretary of state, Hillary Clinton wrote to friends at Wellesley College to thank them. Click to enlarge. (Courtesy: Wellesley College)

Albright became the country’s first female secretary of state in 1997. In doing so, Albright broke a glass ceiling that Wellesley political science professor Craig Murhpy described as  made of “gorilla glass.” But Albright was able to break through it in part because of networks of people who supported her.

As he introduced the honored guest, he smiled:  “Secretary Albright, I want to introduce you to one of those networks: the political science majors of Wellesley College.”

"This is what happens if you go to Wellesley and major in Poli Sci," Albright wrote after becoming secretary of state. Click to enlarge. (Courtesy: Wellesley College)

"This is what happens if you go to Wellesley and major in Poli Sci," Albright wrote after becoming secretary of state. Click to enlarge. (Courtesy: Wellesley College)

Albright arrived to talk foreign policy with student fellows at the Madeleine K. Albright Institute for Global Affairs, which she helped establish at Wellesley. She told the political science majors that they were in pretty rare company — given that of the three women who have served as secretary of state, two were both Wellesley graduates. Albright was the first. Hillary Clinton was the second.

As she spoke to students, Albright recalled a favorite story: “My youngest granddaughter, when she turned seven a couple of years ago said, ‘so what’s the big deal about Grandma Maddie being Secretary of State? Only girls are secretary of state.’ In her lifetime, that would be true.”

We had a chance to sit down with Albright to talk about her work as secretary of state, and began by discussing womens’ rights,  and how she tried to put them at the center of U.S. foreign policy.

Guest:

More:

Please follow our community rules when engaging in comment discussion on this site.

Hosts Meghna Chakrabarti and Anthony Brooks introduce us to newsmakers, big thinkers and artists and bring us stories of relevance to Bostonians here and around the region. Live every weekday at 3.

WBUR's Sacha Pfeiffer is co-hosting Radio Boston while Meghna Chakrabarti is on maternity leave.

  • Listen: Weekdays, 3 p.m. on 90.9 FM
  • Live Call-In: (800) 423-TALK
  • Listener Voicemail: (617) 358-0607
Most Popular
This site is best viewed with: Firefox | Internet Explorer 9 | Chrome | Safari